Scott Billings

Scott Billings

Scott Billings is a freelance journalist and copywriter specialising in museums, galleries and design. He writes for Museums Journal, Museum Practice, Design Week, Marketing and the Design Council, as well as developing communications material for design agencies and public relations consultancies. In addition to writing, he co-founded the bespoke music and sound composition service Glitch & Drone and teaches photography at the Oxford School of Photography.

Contact: www.scottbillings.co.uk

Participatory design: What do you do? And what do you get? ## MuseumNext ##

Tipologia: 
Articolo
Data pubblicazione: 
Marzo 2011
Scott Billings

The article illustrates some of the possibilities of incorporating participation – by design – into the processes of creating exhibitions, as well as the way those exhibitions engage the public. Of course, engagement and collaboration may well form the backbone of many existing museum programmes without the term participatory design (or indeed design for participation) ever being mentioned.

Social conversations ## MuseumNext ##

Tipologia: 
Articolo
Data pubblicazione: 
Marzo 2011
Scott Billings

As the social media explosion rolls on, more and more talk centres around the possibilities – and realities – of interaction, collaboration and dialogue. Now we are all so easily connected, conversations may flow back and forth like never before; at least that’s the promise.

Museums and Augmented Reality ## MuseumNext ##

Tipologia: 
Articolo
Data pubblicazione: 
Marzo 2011
Scott Billings

Does Augmented Reality add something to a museum experience or does it becomes the experience itself? What do we gain from looking at a composite digital/real world through a mobile phone and what do we lose?

Yorkshire’s Favourite Paintings ## MuseumNext ##

Tipologia: 
Articolo
Data pubblicazione: 
Marzo 2011
Scott Billings

The interpretation of collections is a vital element in the public engagement work of most contemporary museums and galleries. Curators, learning departments and exhibition designers all influence how objects are presented and interpreted, often by telling stories, making cross-cultural connections and by providing context and history.
But like almost every area of communication in the 21st century, museum interpretation is becoming a two-way exchange. The rise of social media and its many channels for multiple, personal voices, means that more and more people expect to share their own stories and contexts and offer their own interpretations. This idea is rippling through the arts and cultural heritage world, demonstrated by last year’s Arts Marketing Association conference which focused specifically on shifts from marketing to people towards ways of marketing with people.
This idea of visitor input underpins a project by the Yorkshire Regional Museums Hub to promote the county’s oil painting collections.